jenizupan:

painting our new home

jenizupan:

painting our new home

I googled world funniest joke and this was it

colonelhathi:

  • japan ≠ korea ≠ china
  • pakistan is not in the middle east
  • most muslims aren’t arabs
  • geishas are not prostitutes
  • mexico is a very small part of latin america
  • there are 54 countries in africa
  • china has 56 different ethnic groups and none of them eat chop suey
  • singapore is not part of china
  • most singaporeans speak english as their first language, please don’t ask, “why is your English so good”
tamorapierce:

kateelliottsff:

knitmeapony:


Rebel With a Cause


Keen to continue her studies abroad, Hayat Sindi told her father some good news: She had been accepted at a prestigious university in London. Her traditional Muslim father said it would tarnish the family name for a young woman to live overseas alone. “He told me, ‘Over my dead body,’” Sindi recalls. Still, she persuaded him, and off she went to England.


The truth is, she hadn’t been accepted at any university. When she landed in London as a teenager in 1991, she says, she spoke only Arabic, no English. “My first night there, I went to a youth hostel,” she says. “I was in an attic room. I panicked. I looked at my plane tickets—my father had bought a return ticket. I thought, I’ll go home tomorrow.” Instead she went to an Islamic cultural center and got a translator to help her meet with college officials. “They told me, ‘You’re crazy,’” she says. “I was naive. I thought they would just let me in.”


After a year spent cramming on English and studying to pass the “A-levels,” the U.K.’s college-admission courses, she got herself in to King’s College, where she graduated in 1995 with a degree in pharmacology. She went on to get a Ph.D. in biotechnology from Cambridge in 2001. She says her family didn’t learn about her lie until years later, when they were surprised to hear her mention it in a speech.
“My father was worried that, when I lived abroad alone, I would ruin the family honor,” she says. But in time he boasted to the neighbors, like any proud father. “When he died,” she says, “I found newspaper clippings about me under his pillow.” 
Sindi is known in scientific circles for her “social innovation,” as she calls it, such as co-founding a group at Harvard to develop a new technique for using tiny, cheap slips of paper and a drop of blood or saliva to diagnose liver disease, and perhaps eventually AIDS—potentially replacing costly lab tests. The technology, while still being tested, has the potential to save lives across the developing world.



amazing. simply inspiring.


Boss.

Wow.

Womanpride.

tamorapierce:

kateelliottsff:

knitmeapony:

Rebel With a Cause

Keen to continue her studies abroad, Hayat Sindi told her father some good news: She had been accepted at a prestigious university in London. Her traditional Muslim father said it would tarnish the family name for a young woman to live overseas alone. “He told me, ‘Over my dead body,’” Sindi recalls. Still, she persuaded him, and off she went to England.

The truth is, she hadn’t been accepted at any university. When she landed in London as a teenager in 1991, she says, she spoke only Arabic, no English. “My first night there, I went to a youth hostel,” she says. “I was in an attic room. I panicked. I looked at my plane tickets—my father had bought a return ticket. I thought, I’ll go home tomorrow.” Instead she went to an Islamic cultural center and got a translator to help her meet with college officials. “They told me, ‘You’re crazy,’” she says. “I was naive. I thought they would just let me in.”

After a year spent cramming on English and studying to pass the “A-levels,” the U.K.’s college-admission courses, she got herself in to King’s College, where she graduated in 1995 with a degree in pharmacology. She went on to get a Ph.D. in biotechnology from Cambridge in 2001. She says her family didn’t learn about her lie until years later, when they were surprised to hear her mention it in a speech.

“My father was worried that, when I lived abroad alone, I would ruin the family honor,” she says. But in time he boasted to the neighbors, like any proud father. “When he died,” she says, “I found newspaper clippings about me under his pillow.” 

Sindi is known in scientific circles for her “social innovation,” as she calls it, such as co-founding a group at Harvard to develop a new technique for using tiny, cheap slips of paper and a drop of blood or saliva to diagnose liver disease, and perhaps eventually AIDS—potentially replacing costly lab tests. The technology, while still being tested, has the potential to save lives across the developing world.

amazing. simply inspiring.

Boss.

Wow.

Womanpride.

frantzfandom:

you ever think about the other sperm you beat out to exist?

the astronauts?

the rappers?

the concert pianists?

but you, the tumblr blogger

you won

"Don’t be afraid of death; be afraid of an unlived life. You don’t have to live forever, you just have to live."
Natalie Babbitt, Tuck Everlasting (via anzenu)
655

mamastiles:

men don’t get to decide what is misogynistic

straight people don’t get to decide what it homophobic

cis people don’t get to decide what is transphobic

white people don’t get to decide what is racist

people in positions of power

don’t get to decide what is considered oppression

that’s how we move backwards, not forwards

georgiecummings:

Hands and feet for your ears now at Dagmar Rousset! The new location at 30-32 Easy St, Collingwood is a sight to behold.

georgiecummings:

Hands and feet for your ears now at Dagmar Rousset! The new location at 30-32 Easy St, Collingwood is a sight to behold.

glowcloud:

people run “aesthetic blogs” where they just reblog pics of like neon lights and pools of water and weird textures and stuff and i don’t really get it but i like to look at those blogs, it’s nice to know that you guys are out there, always silent, never getting into fights, just reblogging pics of wrinkled plastic bags… keep doing ur thing

mdme-x:

Alexandra Levasseur